Birthday greetings and felicitations

Sep. 19th, 2017 09:06 am
onyxlynx: Festive pennants in blue & purple with word "Birthday" centered. (Birthday)
[personal profile] onyxlynx
 to [personal profile] randy_byers !  Wishing you a magnificent day.

Birthday greetings and felicitations

Sep. 17th, 2017 09:08 pm
onyxlynx: Festive pennants in blue & purple with word "Birthday" centered. (Birthday)
[personal profile] onyxlynx
 to daisydeadhead!  Hope you managed to stay dry!

9/17/2017 Book log

Sep. 17th, 2017 07:39 pm
tangerine42: (Default)
[personal profile] tangerine42
26. The Girl Who Drank the MoonThe Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill --- 4.5/5. Really good stuff. Lots of feminism, great diverse cast of characters, ostensibly a middle grade book but complex enough for adults, good plotting and characterization. It would make great television.




27. KindredKindred by Octavia E. Butler --- 3/5. Book club pick for September. I think this book was probably hugely important and unique when it came out, but unfortunately, by the time I got to it, it had been forty years and I have read at least ten books doing the same thing. Butler is fantastic now, but this was one of her early ones, and it shows. She's very interested in her message, and not very interested in characterization and plot.





28. The Starlit Wood: New Fairy TalesThe Starlit Wood: New Fairy Tales by Dominik Parisien --- 3/5. A very interesting collection with a few incredible pieces, but more just weird pieces, and a terrible few that absolutely didn't work. Highlights for me included the stories by Naomi Novik, Max Gladstone, Aliette de Bodard ("Pearl" was a sure favorite), and Daryl Gregory. I was excited to see Catherynne M. Valente, Karin Tidbeck, and Seanan McGuire in this collection, but their contributions weren't knock outs. "Some Wait" by Stephen Graham Jones has no idea what it's trying to do. I completely skipped "The Tale of Mahliya and Mauhub and the White-Footed Gazelle" by Sofia Samatar because its structure didn't cohere. So a mix, but I did love how many stories were remixed to be about women's lives.

Stretch goal: 28/30

Women authors: 19/28

(I'm counting the anthology as a "woman" because it's more than 2/3rds woman authors. Binary genders are problematic, etc.)

Dept. of Pain

Sep. 17th, 2017 07:40 pm
kaffyr: (Clara didn't ask for this)
[personal profile] kaffyr
Okay, This Is New. And Awful

Pain. Pain. Pain.  )
major_clanger: Clangers (Royal Mail stamp) (Default)
[personal profile] major_clanger
The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (John Le Carré, 1963)
The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (dir Martin Ritt, 1965)
A Legacy of Spies (John Le Carré, 2017)

‘Peter Guillam, staunch colleague and disciple of George Smiley of the British Secret Service, otherwise known as the Circus, has retired to his family farmstead on the south coast of Brittany when a letter from his old Service summons him to London. The reason? His Cold War past has come back to claim him. Intelligence operations that were once the toast of secret London are to be scrutinised by a generation with no memory of the Cold War. Somebody must be made to pay for innocent blood once spilt in the name of the greater good.’

From that advance plot summary, I expected A Legacy of Spies to be a follow up to the events of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy or its immediate sequels. In fact, it turns out to be a quasi-sequel to The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, Le Carré’s third novel but the one in which he broke out into mainstream success. I say ‘quasi-sequel’, because A Legacy of Spies revisits, and even to an extent retcons, the events of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, and indeed can to a substantial extent be seen as a prequel, setting up some of the important plot points and filling in some key events between that book at Le Carré’s first novel (and introduction of George Smiley), Call for the Dead.

I’d never actually read The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, although I’d long ago seen a plot summary that revealed the key twist. (So, by the way, does this review, hence the cut below.) I read A Legacy of Spies when it came out, saw that it referred back heavily to the events of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold so then read that, and then out of curiosity watched the 1965 film, which currently features on Netflix’s list.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (book)

I won’t spend too much time on the original novel; if you’ve read it, you’ll know how good it is. If you haven’t – well, rather than have it spoiled, I suggest that you go and read it yourself. It’s short by modern standards, very readable, and although the underlying plot is complex (as much as I can say without spoilers) everything is clearly explained.

(Spoilers from here)

Discussion of crucial bits of plot )

A Legacy of Spies is highly recommended, although if you’ve not read The Spy Who Came in from the Cold I’d strongly suggest reading it beforehand. And once you’ve done so, look out the 1965 film, which stands up very well indeed.




Hippo, Birdie, Two Ewes

Sep. 16th, 2017 04:33 pm
onyxlynx: Festive pennants in blue & purple with word "Birthday" centered. (Birthday)
[personal profile] onyxlynx
 to [personal profile] imnotandrei !  Hope the day is pleasant.

In Memoriam

Sep. 16th, 2017 04:10 pm
onyxlynx: Some trees and a fountain at a cemetery (A Fine and Private Place)
[personal profile] onyxlynx

Yahrzeit

Sep. 16th, 2017 04:05 pm
onyxlynx: Some trees and a fountain at a cemetery (A Fine and Private Place)
[personal profile] onyxlynx
 Yahrzeit.

12 years.
kaffyr: The OT3 together, before PotW (Jack and Nine and Rose)
[personal profile] kaffyr
Title: Hearts & Moons Recall the Truth
Author: [personal profile] kaffyr  
Chapter: 28
Previous Chapter: Chap. 27, here, on LJ, or Teaspoon
Characters: the Ninth Doctor, Rose Tyler, Captain Jack Harkness
Rating: PG-13
Author's Note: In which even villains think they're patriots, and we edge closer to a conclusion.
Edited by: the remarkable [personal profile] editrx , who helped me excise unnecessary verbiage and streamline the narrative - thanks! And by my beloved [livejournal.com profile] dr_whuh, without whom none of this would be possible. 
Disclaimer: As much as I wish it were otherwise, no Whoniverse characters are mine. They are the sole property of the BBC and their respective creators. I take no coin or credit, but do thank the BBC for letting me play in their sandbox. 

*************************

filkerdave: Made by LJ user fasterpussycat (Default)
[personal profile] filkerdave

It pretty much kills any real social media time, especially longer-form stuff like DW. I could probably do more if I turned the computer on at night but I really try never to do that when I'm on a project. There's no reason to.

Maybe things will even out a little. I'd made a commitment to myself to write here regularly, and I haven't quite been able to do it for the past few weeks.

On the bright side, Baltimore is a nice town so far. I'm sure there are parts that aren't nice, but that's true of every city, isn't it?

reading wednesday

Sep. 14th, 2017 11:29 pm
boxofdelights: (Default)
[personal profile] boxofdelights
• What are you reading?

Rambunctious Garden: Saving Nature in a Post-Wild World, by Emma Marris. Marris's prose is just pedestrian, neither delightful nor efficient, but it covers the ground she wants to cover, which is intensely interesting to me.

Coincidentally, I just read two links from [personal profile] forestofglory on this topic:
http://edgeeffects.net/uw-arboretum-prairie/
Knowing Prairies, a short graphic essay (like graphic novel, but nonfiction and short) about prairie restoration: what it means, how possible it is, what it is worth. "When I visit the first restored prairie, I don't see a time machine nor a fake nature. Instead, I see a place altered by people negotiating their relationship with the natural world."

and http://uncannymagazine.com/article/packing/
"Packing", by T. Kingfisher, a short story about choosing which species we're going to save.

• What did you recently finish reading?

Beloved, by Toni Morrison, for Classics book group.

I thought this would be a bit easier to read the second time, but it wasn't. It was good to talk about at book group though. I really like the faculty sponsors and the grad student who lead this discussion.
She shook her head from side to side, resigned to her rebellious brain. Why was there nothing it refused? No misery, no regret, no hateful picture too rotten to accept? Like a greedy child it snatched up everything. Just once, could it say, No thank you? I just ate and can't hold another bite?[....]I don't want to know or have to remember that. I have other things to do: worry, for example, about tomorrow, about Denver, about Beloved, about age and sickness not to speak of love.
But her brain was not interested in the future. Loaded with the past and hungry for more, it left her no room to imagine, let alone plan for, the next day[....]Other people went crazy, why couldn't she? Other people's brains stopped, turned around and went on the something new, which is what must have happened to Halle. And how sweet that would have been[....]

I'd like to reread The Fifth Season and think about how it relates to Beloved.

• What do you think you’ll read next?

March, by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell, for Graphic Novel book group.

Bandit and Caroline

Sep. 13th, 2017 05:04 pm
threeringedmoon: (CheesyWebcamPix)
[personal profile] threeringedmoon

This summer, my sister visited us for a short time. Bandit appreciated having another person in his fan club.

Mirrored from Five Acres with a View.

Requiescat in Pace

Sep. 13th, 2017 08:54 am
onyxlynx: Some trees and a fountain at a cemetery (A Fine and Private Place)
[personal profile] onyxlynx
Edith Windsor,
Ultimately, the opinion in Windsor's case became the basis for a wave of federal court rulings that struck down state marriage bans and led to a 2015 Supreme Court ruling giving same-sex couples the right to marry from coast to coast.
ETA: Sir Peter Hall, founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Birthday greetings and felicitations

Sep. 13th, 2017 07:33 am
onyxlynx: Festive pennants in blue & purple with word "Birthday" centered. (Birthday)
[personal profile] onyxlynx
 to [personal profile] madshutterbug !    Hope you're OK and that you and yours are drying out.

Dept. of Woo-Hoo!

Sep. 12th, 2017 08:11 pm
kaffyr: The TARDIS says hello (Default)
[personal profile] kaffyr
I Am Typing This Headline ...

... on my own, my very own, my beloved and darling, laptop PC. 

Which Steven Universe episodes

Sep. 12th, 2017 12:10 am
boxofdelights: (Default)
[personal profile] boxofdelights
...to show someone what makes this show so great?

My daughter doesn't watch much animated stuff and had never heard of Steven Universe, but was intrigued by my description of Amal El-Mohtar's Wiscon GoH speech. If you were to pick a few episodes from the first season to help someone decided whether this is the sort of thing she might like, and you were really hoping she would decide yes, which ones would you pick?

Requiescat in Pace

Sep. 11th, 2017 11:05 pm
onyxlynx: Some trees and a fountain at a cemetery (A Fine and Private Place)
[personal profile] onyxlynx

Loose Ships Sink Lips

Sep. 11th, 2017 07:17 pm
onyxlynx: The words "Onyx" and "Lynx" with x superimposed (Default)
[personal profile] onyxlynx
  • I've seen half of It. I think horror movies in theaters are off my menu. There was a that's it point. I've mostly read the book, although I don't remember the scene.
  • Medical fu.
  • We had one of those stealth thunderstorms. Two guys on the bus were pointing at their iPhone, saying "There's a thunderstorm." (I did not say, guys, the windows are wet and there was a rumble a minute ago.
  • There's an alternate universe in which when we returned from oveseas, Dad got assigned to the Presidio or the Oakland Army Base and I grew up here and get all the arcane references in the Chronicle.
  • Where is that stupid phone bill?
  • Taiko drumming...
  •  

In Memoriam

Sep. 11th, 2017 11:18 am
onyxlynx: Some trees and a fountain at a cemetery (A Fine and Private Place)
[personal profile] onyxlynx
 110 Stories by John M. Ford.

The church across the street is mostly rebuilt
.  Which reminded me of the Burger King on the corner, which had been way back an Automat, and the Manhattan Savings Bank, which had a grand piano which sometimes got played in the afternoons.

Birthday greetings and felicitations

Sep. 11th, 2017 09:56 am
onyxlynx: Festive pennants in blue & purple with word "Birthday" centered. (Birthday)
[personal profile] onyxlynx
to [personal profile] johnpalmer ! (Also [personal profile] longhairedweirdo ! And [Bad username or site: xopher_vh @ livejournal.com]who has not updated in a long time and won't see this.)

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mishalak

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